Interest Rates and Cost Control—it’s been a wonderful life

Broken-piggybank

10 tips to control costs

This WSJ headline caught my attention: Fed’s Fischer: ‘Good Reason’ to Think U.S. Inflation Will Move Higher.  Vice chairman says Fed shouldn’t ‘wait until inflation is back to 2% to begin tightening.’  This should serve as a warning to all companies that the good times may be nearing an end and we may be experiencing the switch from a buyer’s to seller’s market.

Should interest rates rise, many suppliers and supply chains will feel the significant impact of severely extended payment terms. We’ve been working in an economy where the cost of money is relatively low; as interest rates rise, suppliers and the entire supply chain will be impacted by added costs to support the extended terms. As these costs increase, there’s an additional risk that the front-end of the supply chain may not be able to fund or pass through increased costs, causing severe supply chain risk.

Sourcing practitioners have basically two options for dealing with cost containment: wait until the supplier increases the price, then react, or proactively create a cost containment plan that involves the entire organization.

Good proactive cost containment plans require these 10 actions:

  1. Improvement of functional inter-site and intra-business collaboration
  2. Monitoring external markets and market pressure for price increases
  3. Forecasting the impact of potential price increases on the business
  4. Reviewing all contracts to solidify current pricing and prioritizing cost containment targets with quantified objectives
  5. Researching market and supplier data
  6. Building a supply chain map
  7. Running risk assessments on the supply chain
  8. Conditioning suppliers against price increases
  9. Building tactics for delay
  10. Deterring price increases

I have been around long enough to experience cycles of inflation and these actions have been proven successful when dealing with inflation. The difference today with the inflationary periods of the past are that the extended payment terms across the supply chain make some of the suppliers extremely vulnerable to the increased cost for money.

Sometimes forecasting the economy is like using a Ouija board, but all signs are pointing to interest rate hikes, hence, inflation. So, should you wait? I see it like this, borrowing a quote from Clarence in It’s a Wonderful Life, “You see, George, you’ve really had a wonderful life. Don’t you see what a mistake it would be to throw it away?”

Are you ready for a Seller’s Market?

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One response to “Interest Rates and Cost Control—it’s been a wonderful life

  1. Pingback: Why I Worry About Interest Rates (And Maybe You Should, Too) | Sourcing Guy

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