Reward and recognition – the neglected tool for successful teams

holiday-cocktail

It is surprising just how many corporate executives fail to understand that it’s the simple things that make a difference.

Whenever I am working with the indirect expenditure in client organizations, I build cross-business, cross-functional teams. These teams are given clear objectives and goals and asked to build a team charter outlining their mission, roles, responsibilities and accountabilities. In many cases, the teams are launched with some training and development and a mission to gather data. Within 4 weeks, the team returns to make a presentation to senior executives outlining the mission, goals savings opportunities, risks and strategies. For many of the team members, this is their first exposure corporate executives.

Once approved, the team is given 4 additional weeks to bring the project plan back and an implementation team will be assigned. I also suggest that individual performance reflect the team performance so everyone has a stake in the game. The teams I’ve worked with have delivered cost improvement, process improvement, risk reduction and in many cases, increased shareholder equity.

When complete, I suggest the executives reward the team. They are normally surprised and many have asked me what should the reward be. I always say anything that recognizes that the team worked on the project in addition to their regular job, fostered collaboration and brought extraordinary results to the business. The reward is never about money, but always about a recognition that there was a major contribution to the business.

One CEO arranged for the team members and their significant other be picked up by limo and treated to dinner at the best restaurant in town. A small token of appreciation was given along with participation of the executive team. It’s been several years, but the team still talks about how they were recognized.

The company had many volunteers to join teams and make a big contribution. It’s best to understand that rewards like this bring loyalty and incentivize team members and other employees to be part of success. It’s a small price to pay for the benefits that are gained by collaboration, communication and success.

How do you reward good team performance?

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One response to “Reward and recognition – the neglected tool for successful teams

  1. Richard Weissman

    I find please and thank you to be the most powerful words in business.

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