Commodities Could Be Trouble in 2017

money-crop

Have we been lured into complacency with commodities that have fallen over the past year impacting cost of major raw materials and our profitability? With corn over 40% down, copper 38% down and wheat more than 30% down, it is apparent that we have enjoyed significant market opportunities. Having traded commodities in my career, I know that commodities run on a cycle and the good times may be close to an end. A good example of commodity cycles is peanuts, where prices rose 33% in 2016, but bumper crops were expected in the current season, which should drive prices down. Today in the Spend Matters guest post US Peanut Prices Increase More Than 30% in 2016, Mintec noted persistent rains in China have caused high moisture levels in the peanut crop, which will greatly affect quality and price.

In a Bloomberg report on Barclays Black Swan Threats to Commodities, there is upside risk for raw materials in 2017 and the likelihood of further upside risk based on radical changes in the global economy, energy markets and global political risks on trade. Another dynamic that could impact all buyers involved in international trade is the opportunity and potential for disruption and risk posed by currency. With Switzerland announcing that it’s abandoning its peg to the Euro, the unknown impact of Brexit and China changing how exchange rates are fixed, it could signal volatility.

In many companies, procurement and finance have a joint obligation to protect the company’s profit plan. The goal of managing commodities and currency is not to speculate, but to assure the profitability across the organization is maintained. If you’re planning a commodity or currency strategy, here are three approaches to consider:

  1. Cover 70 to 80% of the plan, leaving 20 to 30% flexibility to move with key markets
  2. Develop formula-based pricing levels
  3. Work with finance to build currency hedging by buying foreign currency or by changing contract pricing to US dollars

It does make sense to look on the horizon for any currency or commodity that might pose potential risks and build the plan prior to any change in market pricing. There is no doubt that 2017 will bring a new frontier to global trade and it’s best to be prepared, rather than be surprised.

How will you manage volatility should it arise?

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2 responses to “Commodities Could Be Trouble in 2017

  1. Is it a good time to lock-in longer term pricing?

  2. SourcingGuy blog

    You should watch the market closely to monitor the trend. Any sign of upward change indicates you should lock in a portion of your demand and continue to watch the market and protect the profit plan.

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