Five Key Mistakes that Hurt Negotiations

After a career working with sourcing managers, I’ve had a chance to observe great practices and others that should be avoided. These 5 tips keep coming up when I work with teams in procurement.

  1. Too Much information – Suppliers are constantly collecting information about you, your organization and your interests, all for the sake of building strategies to motivate decisions in their favor. Beware of Facebook, Instagram and other personal social media outlets that provide details about your hobbies, family and interests. I often see posts by sourcing managers, sales reps and marketing reps on Facebook and Instagram that discuss travel and negotiation activity – I do suggest that you search Facebook for your company name and representatives’ names to see what they’re thinking; just don’t post that type of information yourself! In my case, I use LinkedIn for business, avoid friending business contacts on my personal Facebook account and am mindful of what I post.
  2. Failure to truly understand supplier motivation – Most sourcing managers understand the profit motivation of suppliers, but they fail to account for cash flow, capacity, business information, global footprint, your company’s reputation, being associated with an industry leader, capacity utilization, impact on fixed cost, ease of doing business and many more reasons that your business is desirable. These factors are the keys to unlocking the supplier’s true interests in doing business with your firm. In my case referrals are a motivating factor since 80% of my business is the result of a referral.
  3. Emphasis on supplier’s gain in negotiation – We’ve all done this in our lives–trying to negotiate with a supplier on why it is to his/her advantage to meet our targets. We seek win-win and list myriad positive what-you-have-to-gain reasons for coming to agreement. My wife says “If I were only one-tenth as motivated by the benefits of healthy habits as I am by the consequences of not saving my work on the PC every 5 minutes, I’d weigh 120 pounds and run marathons.” We tend to approach suppliers with what we all gain rather than what we have to lose by not meeting the targets. We certainly want mutual benefit, but sometimes we fail to talk about what we could lose. Are you more motivated to do things meet your “win” goals than you are to do things to avoid a loss?
  4. Using power, threat and coercion when you are unprepared to take action – If you are going to use this method of persuasion, you need to follow through with your threat. If you say that the supplier is likely to lose business by failure to comply with your request, be prepared to take action. Never make a threat you can’t back up. If suppliers are truly strategic to your business, they will call you out and you could lose all credibility with the supplier. Of course, power, threat and coercion are tactics you should only use in very specific applications under very specific circumstances, right?
  5. Managing suppliers via text messaging –Text messaging works great if you need quick answers or have a simple question. If overused or abused, you become a nuisance. Nothing can replace a quick call to gain alignment on a complex issue. Unfortunately in today’s fast-pace environment we look for quick solutions. It’s easy to decline a request on an email or text message; it is a lot more difficult if you are making the request in person or on the telephone. Remember that negotiation begins long before you sit across the table.

Think about all communication and actions when working with suppliers and avoid the pitfalls and mistakes that can cost your organization dearly.

Have you ever screwed up a negotiation?

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