Tag Archives: Team building

The best revenge is success!

football-american-game-runner

What still resonates with me 10 days after the Super Bowl

Yes, like many of you I’m adjusting to the gap between the end of the football season and the start of baseball. This year, though, I’m still thinking about the Super Bowl and the leadership it takes to succeed in adversity. While faced with adversity, several players in the Super Bowl had been cut from their former squad’s mid-season and, of course, Tom Brady was suspended for 4 games. Against all odds, after a blowout 1st half, the Patriots team maintained a steady head and won the game.

I listened to a Terry Bradshaw interview with Tom Brady about leadership and it really made me think. His attitude was incredible. He indicated as a leader you are the one person that can motivate he team, if you persist you will succeed, and the team will believe that they will succeed. If you come to the huddle defeated and down, the team will also reflect that feeling. The team executed a flexible strategy, stayed motivated and overcame unbelievable odds.

The leadership lesson we can all take away is that a steady leader with a flexible strategy, motivated team and steady execution of the strategy will succeed against all odds.

The best revenge is success! Congratulations to the Patriots!

Are you down for the count or on a steady course to win?

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What have you done for them lately?

I worked with a food industry client whose team was dedicated, hard working, and focused on their mission to reduce costs and deliver value. It was extremely competitive industry and the media reported that competitors were doing poorly based on price increases on commodities and raw materials. When this client reported a 57% increase in profit with a 9% increase in sales for the quarter, it became obvious to all that the procurement team was driving the results.

When I had a conversation with the CEO about providing a reward and recognition for this hard working team, he was astonished that I would ask what he planned to do for the team. Admitting he’d not thought of holding an event to reward and recognize the entire team, he was willing to try. He decided to host a dinner at the city’s finest restaurant. He invited all of the purchasing employees and their significant others and arranged a limo pickup for each. The CEO provided a nice gift for both the employees and their guests and thanked the guests for their sacrifice for the company to achieve this milestone. Needless to say, this recognition was the talk of the company for a long time. The team continued to excel and later the CEO acknowledged that this low cost activity provided many benefits long after the event occurred.

When economic and business conditions deteriorate, many companies cut employee reward activities when they are needed most. Low cost events can pull the team together and focus them on a shared vision and mission. While most companies acknowledge teambuilding as a key to organization development, they fail to see how a reward event can drive:

• Goal alignment
• Interpersonal relationships
• Role clarification
• Improved problem solving skills
• Sense of purpose

I think every leader should budget and plan for team events globally. These do not need to be elaborate nor expensive to be effective. The ability to have fun, get to know others in a non-work/political setting, and build understanding and trust go a long way to improving team performance and team dynamics. Don’t wait for a formal meeting or strategy session to do some teambuilding, although that is what many firms do. With finding and retaining talent a challenge, don’t forget the importance of a feeling of belonging to a team and company.

Looking for ideas for team activities? Here’s a good list I read recently “5 Team Building Activities That Don’t Suck”, January 2, 2015 — Posted By Kim Tracy Prince. And, here’s a list of fun events I’ve seen:

1. Whirly Ball
2. Bocce ball
3. Paint Ball
4. Picnic in the parking lot on a work day
5. Bowling
6. Attend a sports event

Casey Stengel said: “Gettin’ good players is easy. Gettin’ ’em to play together is the hard part.”

What will you do for your team?

Don’t dominate, collaborate

As companies bring smart purchasing strategies to new categories of spend, there is a danger for procurement professionals who are too eager to prove their worth. While management in production or engineering may have become familiar with cross-functional teams addressing a sourcing issue, marketers and other owners of indirect spend often have had very little experience working with procurement professionals except at the administrative level. They are likely to view any involvement as an intrusion into their professional relationships.

Good guidance for procurement staff is to approach those situations with a goal to collaborate, not dominate. Look for small successes to build trust, not home runs in the first few innings. Fred Parkinson wrote a nice piece about engaging stakeholders for our eBulletin last summer.  Click here to read it.